When the Sun Hits

Brooklyn_1Sheet_Mech_7R1.inddIs there any child actor in recent memory who’s so completely lived up to her potential as Saoirse Ronan? Ever since her arrival at age 13 in 2007’s Atonement, she’s been never less than fantastic in every movie in which she’s appeared, lifting even pedestrian hooey like the Stephanie Meyer adaptation The Host into the realm of the watchable. Most importantly, though, she’s had an unerring eye for quality projects, appearing in prestige films (The Grand Budapest Hotel; The Lovely Bones), small movies from well-respected directors (Peter Weir’s The Way Back; Neil Jordan’s Byzantium), and entertaining experiments (Hanna; Violet & Daisy). Brooklyn is just the latest in her line of successes, and it’s easily one of the best movies of 2015.

The weird thing about Brooklyn, though, is that it’s one of those movies that works really well even though I’m hard-pressed to explain why. On paper, the story – young girl from rural Ireland emigrates to the U.S. and falls in love with an Italian guy despite the pull of home – isn’t particularly compelling, Nick Hornby’s dialogue isn’t especially showy, and John Crowley directs with sensitivity but with no more bells and whistles than the story requires (which is to say none at all). So most of the things that usually draw me to a movie were absent from Brooklyn.

brooklyn stillWhat it comes down to, really, is the appeal of Ronan’s Eilis, who’s sweet and kind even when suffering with an eminently relatable bout of homesickness, and her Italian beau, Tony, who falls juuuussssst on the tolerable side of “aw shucks” sappiness. They’re a couple that’s easy to root for, especially when Eilis is called back to Ireland and finds herself struggling with a variety of pressures that threaten to keep her away from Tony, and America, forever. Eilis’ ache is palpable, knowing what she’s left behind in America but feeling the inexorable pull that the easy comfort of home usually has. It’s to Ronan’s credit that this is a real dilemma – we buy into the push/pull she feels even though by this point we’re fully on board with her new life in the big city. It’s a sophisticated, nuanced performance that never takes the easy way out, and it confirms that Ronan will be worth watching for decades.

Add in a vibrant cast of supporting characters (the tenants and owner of Eilis’ New York boarding house; Tony’s family; a friendly Irish priest played by the reliably excellent Jim Broadbent) and Brooklyn is a huge smothering bear hug of a movie, the cinematic equivalent of slipping into a warm bath or sipping a mug of cocoa while snow gently drifts from the sky. It’s a movie to make you feel good – nothing fancy, just a simple story well told by people who know exactly what they’re doing.

*****

Current listening:

Afghan black

The Afghan Whigs – Black Love (1996)

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